Lifestyle, Money Mindset, Personal Finance

Is the Entertainment Book worth it?

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Recently, my partner and I made the exciting yet slightly unsure decision to buy an Entertainment membership. You may have heard of the Entertainment book, which claims that you can “discover thousands of valuable 2-for-1 and up to 50% off offers for many of the best restaurants, cafés, arts, attractions, hotels, travel, shopping and much more.”

How true is this? Today, I’d like to share with you our experience so far.

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Budgeting, Money Mindset, Personal Finance

How I Saved $232 a Month While Looking for a Job

Hi friends,

Today I wanted to share with you how I reduced my monthly expenses, and talk about whether I’ve noticed much difference in my life. I’d like to thank a brief period of unemployment that motivated me to make these positive changes, some of which were only temporary – if it weren’t for my need to reduce expenses, I might’ve never truly evaluated where my money was going, and what was important to me.

Here’s exactly what I cut back on..

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Money Mindset, Personal Finance

How I’m Paying Off My Debt Faster | 3 Easy Ways

Becoming debt-free has always been one of my biggest personal finance goals – and last year, I got to say that I achieved this. It was the moment I received a letter from my finance company confirming that my car, a gorgeous red Mini Cooper, had officially been paid off!

YASSSSS!!!

For a time, I had no consumer debt – and it felt good not to owe anyone anything. Unfortunately, this didn’t last too long because shortly after, I had to get several expensive dental treatments. Fortunately, my local dental clinic partnered with a finance company to offer interest-free finance for 6 months – so naturally, I went ahead for the sake of my oral health.

This interest-free finance felt like a personal loan, but technically, it was a credit card – and once issued, I was approved with a credit limit way higher than I needed. Seeing that they wanted me to spend more, accruing more interest, I reduced my credit limit immediately to help myself resist the temptation to spend. On top of this, here’s 3 more easy, effortless ways that I’m paying off my debt faster that you may find helpful too!

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Homeownership, Lifestyle, Money Mindset, Personal Finance

My Personal Home Buying Experience (Auckland, NZ)

Last year, I ticked off one of my bucket list goals: buy a freehold property. And by tick off, I mean literally – it’s long been written in my Bucket List Journal, alongside goals like ‘Go to Japan’, ‘Try anti-gravity yoga’, ‘Go to Tomorrowland in Belgium’ and ‘Fly a plane’. Needless to say, it was a dream come true!

After I shared the news, I got asked more or less the same questions from friends & acquaintances. So today I’d love to share my home buying journey, as a recount of my personal experience – ie. I’m not writing this from a place of trying to give financial advice, but from human to human to share what it was all like.

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The first thing I did was educate myself on KiwiSaver and how it can help you to buy your first home. I researched the eligibility criteria and house caps, then went ahead and applied for the HomeStart Grant. Since I’d been contributing to KiwiSaver for over three years, I was confident I’d be accepted. So when I received my pre-approval, I was ecstatic!

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Budgeting, Money Mindset, Personal Finance

How to Live on 80% of Your Income

When it comes to budgeting your money, it can be confusing to know where to start. How much should you be spending – and what should you be spending on? How much is ‘normal’ to spend on everything in your life, from your rent or mortgage, your car, entertainment and eating out?

If you have no idea where to start, or would just like to refresh your money mindset and give your budget a makeover, here’s a super simple budgeting rule: the 50/30/20 rule.

If you have a 50/30/20 budget, that means that:

50% of your net income goes towards needs;

30% of your net income goes towards wants; and

20% of your net income goes towards your financial goals, like paying off debt or buffing up your savings.

Let’s say that I bring home $1500 every fortnight. Ideally, my budget would look like this:

$750 (50%) for my needs;

$450 (30%) for my wants; and

$300 (20%) for my financial goals

So what does this mean? Because 50% goes towards needs and 30% goes towards wants, that means that 80% of your budget is allocated, leaving you with 20% to grow in your personal finance goals. Of course, if you can increase that 20% to 30%, 40% or more, even better! In an ideal world, right?

What it means for you is that you need to learn to live on 80% of your income. Here’s how I did it, and you can too!

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